Why Should Preschoolers Use Retrieval Practice?

Why Should Preschoolers Use Retrieval Practice? In many ways, preschoolers are just like all other learners. They acquire skills incrementally, build upon prior knowledge, and solve problems through trial-and-error. They rely on memory for learning. Like other learners, preschoolers benefit from a strategy called retrieval practice. Retrieval practice is calling to mind (retrieving) what has […]

Ordering Summer Solutions

Time for Teachers to Take Action How to Purchase Summer Solutions   Preventing the Summer Slide Summer Solutions is the natural extension of Simple Solutions. We like to think of it as our “fifth quarter” or “third semester.” Without ongoing review and practice over the summer break, children forget much of what they learned during […]

summer slide

End the Summer Slide with Summer Solutions

Ahh, summer! Who doesn’t look forward to a couple months of warmth, sunshine, and some well-deserved R&R? Don’t worry, it’ll be here before you know it. But, as it so often goes, with the good comes the bad–the summer slide. The Research Parents, teachers, and researchers all know that summer learning loss, or the summer […]

Harry Potter

Harry Potter: A Rich Source of Descriptive Language

A recent trip to the Wizarding World of Harry Potter at Universal Studios had me thinking back to my first Harry Potter memory and the treasure trove of descriptive language found in the series. Do you have an early Harry Potter memory? Mine was the summer of ‘99. I heard Oprah Winfrey talking about a […]

Practice is Practice, Right?

Part 3: Help Students Understand the Benefits of Distributed Practice and Retrieval Practice In the last two blogs, we looked at distributed practice and retrieval practice—and why combining them is an effective way to increase long-term retention. Use this lesson to explain the strategies and help your students use them more. Just to review, retrieval […]

Destined for the Stars: Caroline Lucretia Hershel

Too often, women scientists labored under the shadow of men, but that was only partially true in the case of Caroline Lucretia Hershel, our Women’s History Month spotlighted scientist. Caroline was born on March 16, 1750 in Hanover, Germany. Her father, a talented musician, encouraged all his children to study music, as well as math […]

A New Way to Celebrate Black History Month

Here is a multi-layered Black History Month project that you can do with your upper elementary/middle school students. Pick the layer you’re comfortable with — or have time for — and go to town. LAYER 1 introduces students to this cream-of-the-crop website, The Undefeated 44, that has portraits and short biographical pieces of prominent African Americans. […]

Honoring our Presidents

It’s February, when teachers everywhere turn to thoughts of… presidents. I, being no different, made sure to attend the updated and recently reopened Hall of Presidents attraction during my recent trip to Disney World. The video portion of the presentation appears on a panoramic screen. It tells how the Founding Fathers had a new idea […]


Galileo  Happy  454th Birthday!    I had such fun writing the Ben Franklin birthday blog, I thought I’d write about another scientist. I stumbled upon Galileo’s name in a novel I was reading, Rules of Civility by Amor Towles, in which two characters briefly discuss one of Galileo’s discoveries. “What I recall about this Galileo […]

Take Your Class On A Virtual Field Trip

Snap out of the day-to-day monotony in the classroom by planning a virtual field trip to…anywhere. Virtual field trips are a great way to enhance your curriculum and make learning more engaging. They incorporate 21st century technology in a meaningful way, provide interactive learning experiences, and expose students to places they may never have a […]