Fostering Information Literacy

There are many ways to define Information Literacy. It might best be viewed as the sum of some of its basic components: needing, gathering, evaluating, and using information. One dilemma facing teachers today is guiding students towards reputable, current, and authoritative sources with rich content. To label reporting “fake news” leaves students wondering how to know […]

WORLD WAR I ARMISTICE CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION

THE ELEVENTH HOUR OF THE ELEVENTH DAY OF THE ELEVENTH MONTH Celebrating the 100 Year Anniversary of the WORLD WAR I ARMISTICE     11/11/1918 Many associate the poppy with veterans. This most likely stems from the poem written by World War I Canadian soldier, John McCrae, “In Flanders Fields.” On Armistice Day, Americans gratefully acknowledged the […]

Happy Birthday to the Father of Microbiology

On October 24th, 2016, Google honored Antoni van Leeuwenhoek’s 384th birthday with the daily Google Doodle. Leeuwenhoek (Lee vǝn hook), a Dutch cloth merchant by trade, is known as the Father of Microbiology. He may have used magnification to determine the density of a fabric’s thread count. With no formal university training, he designed and […]

2018 The Year of the Bird

October Global Big Day Is Coming: Your Students Can Take Part The Audubon Society, Cornell Lab of Ornithology, National Geographic, Bird Life International and others declared 2018 as the Year of the Bird. It is an important year for birds, as it marks the centennial of what National Geographic believes to be the single most […]

Harry Potter Takes Broadway, and Your Classroom, by Storm

We wrote about Bertie Bott’s Every-Flavour Beans1 which included such culinary delights as vomit, rotten egg, soap, and booger in Level 2 of our Reading Comprehension  series. No surprise that the opening of Harry Potter and the Cursed Child on Broadway has led Jelly Belly to re-release this popular treat which, for the faint of […]

Bike Cruising in Portugal!

    Regina, Kim, and Diane (that’s me) work at Simple Solutions, but we’re on vacation right now. We’ve packed our bags and bicycles and headed out on an adventure that, for us, is an entirely new way to travel: bike cruising! This vacation is part cruise since we spend our nights aboard a ship […]

Fostering Information Literacy

There are many ways to define Information Literacy. It might best be viewed as the sum of some of its basic components: needing, gathering, evaluating, and using information. One dilemma facing teachers today is guiding students towards reputable, current, and authoritative sources with rich content. To label reporting “fake news” leaves students wondering how to […]

Joseph Dalton Hooker: Botanist for the Ages

I write a blog every month about a scientist worth knowing. For June’s scientist, I have chosen a rather obscure botanist (obscure by American standards), Joseph Dalton Hooker. He meets my criterion of being born in June—June 30, 1817—to be precise. And, a happy coincidence, the first full week in June is National Garden Week. […]

John Muir: Called by the Mountains

April’s highlighted scientist is naturalist, John Muir. Muir was born on April 21, 1838, in the small coastal town of Dunbar, Scotland. His family emigrated to Wisconsin when he was 11, eventually settling on Hickory Hill farm. Muir’s father, a strict taskmaster, allowed little free time for his two sons, but enough for John to […]

Destined for the Stars: Caroline Lucretia Hershel

Too often, women scientists labored under the shadow of men, but that was only partially true in the case of Caroline Lucretia Hershel, our Women’s History Month spotlighted scientist. Caroline was born on March 16, 1750 in Hanover, Germany. Her father, a talented musician, encouraged all his children to study music, as well as math […]