2018 The Year of the Bird

October Global Big Day Is Coming: Your Students Can Take Part

The Audubon Society, Cornell Lab of Ornithology, National Geographic, Bird Life International and others declared 2018 as the Year of the Bird. It is an important year for birds, as it marks the centennial of what National Geographic believes to be the single most important legislation protecting birds …. anywhere …. ever! It is the Migratory Bird Treaty Act of 1918 and was signed by Canada, Mexico, the US, and others. It is with this legislation in mind that I chose to dedicate this blog to John James Audubon. This fall as you head back to school, take advantage of a meaningful opportunity to be outside with your students. They’ll enjoy spending time outdoors and being a part of this important global event!

Global Big Day 2018: A Birding World Record shows May’s eBirding results and announces 2018’s 2nd Big Day, Sat, October 6th.  The last sentence of this link reads: “Birds connect us. eBird connects birders. We can’t wait to see what you continue to find—and share.”  At the time of this post, few official details of the October 6th Big Day had been released.  Follow this link to eBird to stay tuned for the most up-to-date information. Mark the date…Have fun, and we’ll see you out there.

Audubon, who was born in what is now Haiti, crisscrossed the Atlantic, living in France, Pennsylvania, Kentucky, England, and New York. He was a businessman first, and an artist and bird enthusiast second. Many of the years he spent drawing birds were spent surviving the rugged American wilderness. Beyond his unquestionably beautiful avian renditions, he was the first known bander of bird legs, leading to the discovery that migratory birds annually return to their same nesting grounds. For more information on John James Audubon, visit the National Audubon Society site or Burroughs’ biography freely available on Project Gutenberg.

You, the teacher, can take your students to new heights with these cross-curricular activities on Audubon, birds, and the Year of the Bird:

  • Bird Song Hero Learn to recognize bird songs by seeing the pattern of various chirps.

  • Junior Duck Stamp Conservation Program a dynamic art- and science-based curriculum that teaches wetland and waterfowl conservation to students K through high school. This year’s winner is 18-year-old Rayen Kang of Johns Creek, Georgia.  Her winning entry is a painting of an emperor goose.

  • Migratory Bird Act explained; social studies students can explore the act and the participating countries.

The number of bird activities and ways to engage students is virtually unlimited. Your students can learn, participate, and even improve the environment for birds.

Post Author: Diane

Diane D has been researching and writing for Simple Solutions since retiring from her teaching position at the Nordonia schools. She holds a Bachelor’s degree in Biology and a Master’s degree in Library and Information Science. Diane, who is fluent in Italian, travels a lot, bikes every opportunity she gets, rock climbs, skis, and has recently joined a rowing team.